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Thursday, September 21, 2017
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Founder. Farbound.Net

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The intent of Farbound.Net is to encourage travel and exploration to foster a deeper respect of the world we live in. Cultivate in people a love and responsibility towards the environment, species and humanity. And contribute to the growth of tourism, area specific businesses, institutions and services. Farbound.Net is also a knowledge platform for people from across the globe to connect over and welcomes readers to suggest their views, inputs and discuss featured topics using the comment box, responsibly. To know more about Farbound.Net connect with me via email: founder.farbound.siddhartha@gmail.com or call: +91 9805626010.
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Delhi’s underground summer retreat.

Dug deep into the earth to tap subterranean ground water, the stepwells of India were once a popular retreat for the common man to escape the blistering summer heat - a film by Wilderness Films India.

Bustling when not sleeping.

From obscure origins to a thriving town, explore the metamorphosis of Bhuntar - an unheard of mid size town in Himachal Pradesh, India.

Blockbuster ideas.

Small towns can surprise one with their unique ability for improvisation and spirit of enterprise like the once popular video hut that let local inhabitants and school boys on town leave indulge their love for the movies before the advent of cable television.

The dharma abode of great bliss.

True to its Tibetan name, the Dechen Choekhor Mahavira sits in the midst of peace and tranquility on a small hilltop overlooking the scenic outskirts of Bhuntar, Himachal Pradesh, India.

Under the shadow of the Rana Mahal.

The Rana Mahal - an imposing structure built by the far away Hindu Rajput kings to commemorate their one true faith and perhaps attain Moksha by living out their last days in the holy city of Varanasi, India.

The walking dead.

Having fulfilled his worldly commitments, the wandering ascetic (known as a Sadhu in many parts of India) is required by ancient customs to attend his own funeral before he can begin his spiritual journey under the tutelage of a Guru (teacher)